Equipment

The chilling effect of a cold wind, particularly if clothing is wet, can induce hypothermia. A good way to dress is based on the use of a wind and waterproof outer 'shell', usually a waterproof jacket and over-trousers. 'Breathable' materials such as Goretex are preferred for comfort. The shell is combined with layers of warm clothing underneath, such as a fleece jacket and walking trousers. To maintain a comfortable temperature it will be necessary to put on and take off layers during a walk. In particular it is a good idea to put on extra clothing during stops such as lunch breaks, or you will rapidly cool down.

A good pair of walking boots is essential to give support to the ankles and protect the feet on rough and wet ground. An ice axe and crampons may be essential for some Scottish winter routes. However, the Stocket walks generally avoid routes where these are required, as prior experience in their use is necessary.

The following equipment is suggested. However, it is your responsibility to be properly equipped for the hill.

SUMMERWINTER
Boots (not trainers), Socks, Gaiters to keep heather out and aid crossing water Boots (not trainers), Socks, Gaiters to keep heather out and aid crossing water
Water/wind proof jacket Water/wind proof jacket
Waterproof over-trousers Waterproof over-trousers
A pair of poles can be very useful to ease the joints and provide stability A pair of poles can be very useful to ease the joints and provide stability
Warm clothing (thermal/fleece). A lightweight "belay" jacket is recommended for putting on at stops. Warm clothing (thermal/fleece). A lightweight "belay" jacket is recommended for putting on at stops.
Trousers or similar (not jeans) Trousers or similar (not jeans)
Rucksack and spare clothes (eg socks, gloves) Rucksack and spare clothes (eg socks, gloves)
Survival bag, Whistle Survival bag, Whistle
Food and drink (Thermos flask) Food and drink (Thermos flask)
Map (OS 1:50,000 advised) and compass Map (OS 1:50,000 advised) and compass
Hat & Gloves Hat & Gloves
Sun cream & Midge repellant Torch (head torch preferred)
Shorts (optional) Ice axe and crampons

Clothing comes down to personal preference. Talk to other people who hillwalk, try things on in the outdoor shops, and make sure you are comfortable with wearing it.

Please also note the following advice for getting the most out of a day in the hills:

The Club runs an occassional Hill Skills course which gives you the opportunity to learn more about hillwalking in Scotland. Look out for emails announcing these courses.